“Amor for Alex Now and Forever Memorial Concert!” Tuesday, March 21, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. Brava Theater, SFM

Tuesday, March 21, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. at the Brava Theater, SFM, A community concert celebration to kick-start the “Alex Nieto Memorial” campaign! Live performances by “The Alex Nieto Latin Jazz Ensemble” featuring Carlos “Kookie” Gonzales, Karl Perazzo (Santana), Dr. Loco (Jose Cuellar); Paul Flores, Francisco Herrera, Josue Rojas, Favi (Natalia) Estrella, Alejandro Murguia (SF Poet Laureate), Loco Bloco, Antonio Theodore (Afrolicious), Danzantes, y mas! Get your tickets now at the link below, as this is sure to be a sold-out historic event! Candy colored lowriders will be posted in front for your visual pleasure 🙂

https://www.brava.org/all-events/2017/3/21/amor-for-alex-nieto-now-and-forever-memorial-concert

ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE ALEX NIETO MEMORIAL!

                             “Amor for Alex Now and Forever Memorial Concert!”
                           Tuesday, March 21, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. Brava Theater, SFM

On the third year anniversary of Alex Nieto’s demise, join the entire community for the “Amor for Alex Now and Forever Memorial Concert!”

As you may know the San Francisco Board of Supervisors’ voted 9 to 1 in favor of the “Amor for Alex Nieto” Memorial, which means that this ordinance is veto proof from the Mayor. We, the gente, will transform history with this powerful monument on top of Bernal Heights.

For Alex Nieto, for our community, we fought this fight, and we won the first memorial ever in California dedicated to a victim of a police killing. We held our dignity and proved to the world how the gente argue better and action more creatively and courageously than anyone ever could imagine.

Once the memorial is established, community members will hike up to that mountain and pray like Alex did and look out over the beautiful view of San Francisco and be inspired by our community resilience. Students will travel up to that hill for field trips and to learn about the history and creativity of our community; they will write thousands of educational essays. Families will pilgrimage hands together and love each other at the place where Alex breathed his last breath. This will be a place of peace, of inspiration and amor.

Against the violence and injustice of 59 bullets, family and community rose to defend honor and promote positive spirit.

Amor for Alex Nieto: March 4, 1986 to March 21, 2014.

ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE ALEX NIETO MEMORIAL!

Food and beverages will be provided.
Box office and doors open at 6:30 p.m.

https://www.brava.org/all-events/2017/3/21/amor-for-alex-nieto-now-and-forever-memorial-concert
Amor for Alex Nieto Now and Forever Memorial Concert
A community concert celebration to kick-start the Alex Nieto Memorial campaign PURCHASE TICKETS!

 

PRESS RELEASE: Alex Nieto Memorial Celebration!

PRESS RELEASE

Alex Nieto Memorial Celebration and Community Proclamation to Fire SFPD Officer Roger Morse, Wednesday, December 21, 2016 at 4:00 p.m. at the North Side of Bernal Heights Park (top of Folsom Street)

CONTACTS:

Benjamin Bac Sierra, M.A., J.D.

Roberto Hernandez

Ely Flores

Email : info@justice4alexnieto.org

Join the entire community at a press conference this Wednesday, December 21 at 4:00 p.m. at the north side of Bernal Heights Park to celebrate “The Alex Nieto Memorial Victory!” Last week the San Francisco Board of Supervisors’ voted 9 to 1 in favor of the memorial, which means that this ordinance is veto proof from the Mayor.

At the same time, with our power of amor, we will demand SFPD Officer Roger Morse be fired from the force for his threats to the Nietos; the San Francisco Office of Citizens Complaints, in an unprecedented decision, has sustained a review that demands action from the Chief of Police (see link below).

For Alex Nieto, for our community, we fought this fight, and we won the first memorial ever in California dedicated to a victim of an unlawful police killing. We held our dignity and proved to the world how the gente argue better and action more creatively and courageously than anyone ever could imagine. Come this Wednesday, so you, too, can celebrate community amor!

Once the memorial is established, community members will hike up to that mountain and pray like Alex did and look out over the beautiful view of San Francisco and be inspired by our community resilience. Students of all ages will travel up to that hill for field trips and to learn about the history and creativity of our community; they will write thousands of educational essays. Families will pilgrimage hands together and love each other at the place where Alex breathed his last breath. This will be a place of peace, of inspiration and amor.

Against the violence and injustice of 59 bullets, family and community rose to defend honor and promote positive spirit.

Amor for Alex Nieto: March 4, 1986 to March 21, 2014.

United we support each other, build momentum, transform the system, and create an authentic history. Food, beverages, and entertainment provided.

To read more about our Alex Nieto Memorial Victory, click here: http://missionlocal.org/2016/12/sf-board-approves-memorial-for-alex-nieto-shot-by-sfpd/

To find out more about Officer Roger Morse’s threats and the Office of Citizen’s Complaints findings, click here: https://justice4alexnieto.org/2016/12/12/breaking-news/

#MorseOffTheForce!!

Now back to an argument I created back in March 2016. Finally our arguments are paying off because as you know the San Francisco Office of Citizens Complaints has now used these arguments to sustain an allegation of CONDUCT REFLECTING DISCREDIT ON THE DEPARTMENT against Officer Roger Morse for behaving inappropriately or and making inappropriate comments is SUSTAINED.

Watch the entire video for la pura neta:

FIRE OFFICER MORSE!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jb3Kjr_I8WM&feature=youtu.be

All love to Ray Balberan for the footage.

Share this unprecedented authentic breaking news far and wide!!!!

For threatening the Nietos and community after the Alex Nieto Trial, The San Francisco Office of Citizens’ Complaints has NOW concluded the following about SFPD Officer ROGER MORSE:

The allegation of CONDUCT REFLECTING DISCREDIT ON THE DEPARTMENT against a police officer for behaving inappropriately or and making inappropriate comments is SUSTAINED.

The matter will now be transmitted to the SFPD Chief of Police for review and ACTION.

This means that Officer ROGER MORSE, who unlawfully killed Alex Nieto, should be punished for making threats after the trial. This has never happened in the history of the Office of Citizens’ Complaints. We, the people, lead the way! We can argue better than them! I thank Father Richard for bringing the matter up to the Office of Citizens’ Complaints. Below you will see the arguments I created on March 18, 2016, once I learned of the threats.

https://todobododown.wordpress.com/…/black-and-brown…/

Amongst other things, we exposed a bona fide threat from SFPD Officer Roger Morse, one of Alex Nieto’s killers. On Facebook, immediately following the verdict, SFPD Officer Roger Morse threatened the Nieto family and Alex Nieto’s friend, presumably me. The following is a copy of the actual text posting on social media’s Facebook by Officer Morse:

“Smiling (referring to Alex Nieto). Ugh how about burning down his house and tazing his friend who pressed charges.”

Officer Roger Morse’s post is a threat in the English language.

I, Benjamin Bac Sierra, hold a B.A. from U.C. Berkeley, a teaching credential certificate and Master’s from San Francisco State University, and a Juris Doctor degree from U.C. Hastings College of the Law. I am a college English instructor and cannot read his statement in any other way except in the correct English manner described above. Any implications that others are attaching to his words are pure speculation. The words must stand on their own, and we must trust the police officer writer knows how to write in English. I have heard no other explanation from the source himself.

#Breaking News!!

Share this unprecedented authentic breaking news far and wide!!!!

For threatening the Nietos and community after the Alex Nieto Trial, The San Francisco Office of Citizens’ Complaints has NOW concluded the following about SFPD Officer ROGER MORSE:

The allegation of CONDUCT REFLECTING DISCREDIT ON THE DEPARTMENT against a police officer for behaving inappropriately or and making inappropriate comments is SUSTAINED.

The matter will now be transmitted to the SFPD Chief of Police for review and ACTION.

This means that Officer ROGER MORSE, who unlawfully killed Alex Nieto, should be punished for making threats after the trial. This has never happened in the history of the Office of Citizens’ Complaints. We, the people, lead the way! We can argue better than them! I thank Father Richard for bringing the matter up to the Office of Citizens’ Complaints. Below you will see the arguments I created on March 18, 2016, once I learned of the threats.

https://todobododown.wordpress.com/…/black-and-brown-unity…/

Amongst other things, we exposed a bona fide threat from SFPD Officer Roger Morse, one of Alex Nieto’s killers. On Facebook, immediately following the verdict, SFPD Officer Roger Morse threatened the Nieto family and Alex Nieto’s friend, presumably me. The following is a copy of the actual text posting on social media’s Facebook by Officer Morse:

“Smiling (referring to Alex Nieto). Ugh how about burning down his house and tazing his friend who pressed charges.”

Officer Roger Morse’s post is a threat in the English language.

I, Benjamin Bac Sierra, hold a B.A. from U.C. Berkeley, a teaching credential certificate and Master’s from San Francisco State University, and a Juris Doctor degree from U.C. Hastings College of the Law. I am a college English instructor and cannot read his statement in any other way except in the correct English manner described above. Any implications that others are attaching to his words are pure speculation. The words must stand on their own, and we must trust the police officer writer knows how to write in English. I have heard no other explanation from the source himself.

Now join us Tuesday, December 13 at 2:00 p.m. for the Alex Nieto Memorial Vote at City Hall’s Board of Supervisors’ Chambers!

https://www.facebook.com/events/1171443486236434/

 threat

Community Meeting Nov. 28th @ 6pm, Bernal Heights Community Center

SHARE THIS FAR AND WIDE:

The only way to the front lines is forward.

community

If you are upset about Trump or the Dakota pipeline, you can and should let your voice be heard. But if you want action, an action that leads to creation, then follow us to the front lines, and it is not in a far off distant land; it is here in our city of San Francisco.

Join us this Monday, November 28 at 6:00 p.m. for the “All Hands Meeting for the Alex Nieto Memorial!” at the Bernal Heights Neighborhood Center on Cortland Street, Alex Nieto’s varrio. For all you OG Veteranos and Veteranas, you know that Cortland is one of our oldest varrios, one of the first places in San Francisco’s Mission/Outer Mission that was gentrified starting back in the 90’s. It was such a loco colorful beautiful hood until they tricked residents into gentrification and kicked them out. Now mostly wealthy white folks live there—lawyers and technology executives. In 2011 they literally erased the varrio history by destroying the Cortland library’s 1983 Native American and cholo mural.

community-2

https://todobododown.wordpress.com/…/all-hands-meeting-for…/

This time we must stand together. History cannot and will not be erased. It is up to you, I literally mean YOU, to make this Alex Nieto memorial reality. Not only is it what the Nietos desire and deserve after being swindled by a mostly white jury out of a just verdict in the civil trial, but also it is what we need as medicine for our community.

We proved Alex’s murder. Check the evidence yourself. I would love to hear any reasonable arguments about how Officer Schiff could, after being counseled by his police officer father, on the night he shot at Alex Nieto, go from saying he looked into Alex’s “angry” eyes and saw his forehead “scrunch” up to being proved a liar two years later in open court— Alex had on a baseball hat and sunglasses on, so it would have been impossible for Officer Schiff to have seen Alex’s eyes or forehead. I would love to hear any explanation of how Alex Nieto’s wrist bone was found in his pocket if, as the officers state, he always had his hands out and pointing a taser. Because there is no reasonable explanation, we must conclude Alex Nieto was unlawfully killed, and this is a severe injustice and tragedy for his family and community. Yet we are thankful for whirlwinds, for they have helped shape who we are: Amor for Alex.

We need mass attendance at this meeting because there may be some who want to erase racism: from the caller, who admitted Alex was doing nothing improper but described him as a “foreigner”, to the dog owner who threatened Alex and spewed obscene racial slurs against him, to the police who profiled him and shot at him fifty nine (59) times. There may be some who want to ignore the corruption of San Francisco: from the district attorney that refused to file criminal charges against the officers, to the collusion between San Francisco and Taser International, the company that gained a two million dollar contract with the city, after manipulating the time stamps on Alex Nieto’s taser so that it would match up nicely with the fabricated police narrative.

We sing NO to erasure. We shout NO to corruption. With the joining now of 3,000 others who have signed the petition and at least four San Francisco supervisors, we demand an ordinance (law) for a memorial tribute to Alex Nieto on Bernal Heights. We imagine community members hiking up to that mountain and praying like he did, looking out over the view of San Francisco and being reminded and reminded of his unlawful death AND our community resilience. We want students of all ages to travel up to that hill for field trips and stand at that memorial site and learn about the history and creativity of our community; they will write thousands of critical educational essays. We want families to pilgrimage hands together and love each other at the place where Alex breathed his last breath. Lovers will make an offering and share a kiss, the way we used to do it up on that mountain in the old days. We want this place to be a place of peace, of inspiration and amor.

We need you there. Your family needs you there. Your community needs you there. Your unborn grandchildren need you there: “All Hands Meeting for the Alex Nieto Memorial!” Monday, November 28, 2016 at 6:00 p.m. at the Bernal Heights Neighborhood Center. Wear red and black in honor of Alex. Join the Facebook event page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1156504267790999/?notif_t=plan_user_associated&notif_id=1478981259825422

Amor for Alex Nieto: March 4, 1986 to March 21, 2014
Against the violence and injustice of 59 bullets, family and community rose to defend honor and promote positive spirit.
Benjamin Bac Sierra, M.A., J.D.

Community meeting Nov. 28th @6pm Bernal Heights Community Center

All Hands Meeting for the Amor for Alex Memorial at the Bernal Heights Neighborhood Center on Monday, November 28 from 6-8 p.m.! Bring banners and your Amor for Alex T-shirts 🙂 Wear red and black in honor of Alex Nieto. Let’s join each other at one of our oldest varrios on Cortland Street!

We thank you for your constant support and love. My friends, with the full Amor of Alex Nieto, join the Facebook event page and invite your friends: https://www.facebook.com/events/1156504267790999/

Because there may be present a minority of misinformed people, we need mass community attendance at this meeting. We must be united at this meeting to stand strong, intellectually aware, and action oriented, as we always have been. Note you will be with great company, as over 2,500 community members have already officially signed the petition to support the memorial. Also, note the following people and organizations that have also backed the memorial:

Amor for Alex Nieto, The University of California, Hastings College of the Law La Raza Law Students, HOMEY, United Playaz, Manilatown Heritage Association, Our Mission No Eviction, Loco Bloco, Supervisors John Avalos, David Campos, Eric Mar, Malia Cohen, the Mayor of La Mission Roberto Hernandez, Justice for Amilcar Perez-Lopez, The Mario Woods Coalition, various labor unions are planning to endorse, and over 2,500 community members.

Amor for Alex Nieto: March 4, 1986 to March 21, 2014

Against the violence and injustice of 59 bullets, family and community rose to defend honor and promote positive spirit.

If you have not yet signed the petition, please do so here: https://www.change.org/p/sign-share-petition-for-permanent-alex-nieto-memorial?recruiter=620382860&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=copylink

We Fly Even When We Fall: A Review of ‘On the Hill: I am Alex Nieto’”

 

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The capacity crowd’s energy is electrifying, urging the young actors to push their souls to the limits, to reach deep down and extract their essence, their street essence, their indigenous essence, their Frisco funk. A Latino and multicultural youth movement explodes in front of your eyes. Candy Contreras. Melissa Gomez. Jocelyn Lainez. Talia Matau. Luis Ramirez Martinez. Nicole Nutterfield. Estela “Nataly” Ortiz. Jad Quesada-Khoury. Lochlein Sekona. Stephanie Tomasulo.

The sound of gunshots greets you to the plot of the play: “On the Hill: I am Alex Nieto.”

Alex Nieto, we learn, was a young man racially profiled by the SFPD and unlawfully killed by 14 of their 59 bullets shot at him on top of Bernal Hill on March 21, 2014. The community would not accept this horror story, so the community rose. The artists rose. The youth rose.

The cast are all young people from the inner city. The musicians are a new breed of Santana/Loco Bloco/hip hop/rap fused artists with their own rock and roll soul slick style. Their music is a reminder of roots and a promise of revolution. Angela Rey. Amadeus Oyagata. Anthony Corona. Cy Thompson. Ariel Mestaller-Orallo. Mosiah Concha. Madison Cenac. Liset Gutierrez. Grace Nevarez-Ortiz.

“On the Hill” constantly confronts their pain, the taboo of gentrification in the most progressive and liberal city on planet earth. San Francisco, the city itself, becomes a main character. This is, however, a universal story, for it forces us to question, then, how racist and classist is it in other places, such as Denver, San Antonio, Walnut Creek, places that are not as open as San Fran. And even here we realize the developers believe the earth was meant to be made into cubicles, partitions, workspaces.

 

Wildflowers must be massacred.

 

Then how can the actors dance their pain away? They dance and gift us creativity and courage, performing intricate moves, tribal acrobatics, ballet-style grace. Nietzsche once proclaimed that a day without dancing is a day without life. These youth prove life in front of our eyes. Here is where the audience begins to see art as an authentic transformation tool. The message is deep: we create our own movements; we transform the tragic into triumph. We mold our own media, not made by politicians or professors, or ultra-intellectual outsiders, but made by people who care about community uplifting. The play is the epitome of vida loca, the street creed. Here locura serves as a medicine and philosophy forward, for who else would create a play that so blatantly confronts the perfect system of corruption?

“On the Hill” exposes the entrenched corruption at every level of the San Francisco machine. Based on actual testimony and trial transcripts, the play reports on the district attorney’s failings to prosecute the police officers who killed Alex, the collusion between the district attorney and the city attorney, the police department’s theft of Alex Nieto’s car and search without a warrant, the city attorney’s attempted manipulation of Yahira, Alex’s girlfriend, Alex’s wrist bone in his pocket.

 

59 shots.

Even with all of this overwhelming evidence, the jury decides against Alex Nieto and in favor of their beloved protectors, the police. The white jury. No African Americans or Latinos served as peers. Nevertheless, the community is not smashed by injustice. We know there is no hope through their system. So we create our own. In the play, the actress that played Elvira Nieto, Alex’s mother repeats: “I am not la llorona, the weeping woman.” We dance to death. We create art out of hatred. We realize and acknowledge our own power and do not hope for others to save us. We have proven we are not helpless. The future, even with all its obstacles, is bright.

Where do we go from here? More places, more performances, worldwide international travelers (or troublers, if you say it with my father’s musical accent). We play in front of their face and show them the roots of Frisco and how we still lead the way, even when they kill us. We continue to fight for justice for Mario Woods, Amilcar Perez-Lopez, Luis Gongora, and all the others who have fallen, unlawfully killed by SFPD.

We fly even when we fall.

We need more writing about this play and these issues. We need our own education, our own arts, our own agency.

We need leaders like Paul Flores, the director, a working star. Consider it was only a month ago that Paul was recruiting actors off the streets. For them to perform the way they did, he must have reached into their guts and souls. Of course they had these gifts inside them all along, but we must praise Paul for his ability to love and to show them to give their love away to an unknown audience. Leaders love, serve, learn, and teach, but don’t bullshit. They train and inspire the next generation. A professional, Paul respected their style and worked to fine-tune it.

Leaders have gotten a bad rap lately—because we imagine idiots. But I am not referencing the clowns or political leaders but authentic organizers full of heart and soul, leaders with vision and selflessness but also with guts and unafraid to be leaders. Leaders work and prove, and the proof is not in a theory but in a substantive action. To accomplish is to practice constantly and to work ceaselessly. We cannot follow shortcuts.

While some may feel disheartened at the end of the play because there is no clear happy Hollywood ending, we must understand that art is not meant to be pure propaganda. Not every singular story or piece of magic surrounding the Alex Nieto movement could be told in ninety minutes. Perhaps more could have been explored about the effects of the intense trial, how, for example, we influenced other art, murals, songs and music, performances and actions, like a 2015 street play, a mock trial where the Nietos actually ripped up the badges of the killer cops, or the feats of the Frisco Five hunger strikers who, with puro locura and love, put their lives on the line in front of the Mission Police Station for 18 days and nights. Perhaps the play could have shown how joined together with other coalitions, such as the Mario Woods and Amilcar Perez Lopez Coalitions, we fired the chief of police of one of the most powerful cities on planet earth.

But that is for another story, one that can be created by our own people. “On the Hill: I am Alex Nieto” serves as a springboard for more. Using this play as a template and inspiration, we can create our own plays, our own world. That’s the way I see it. That’s the way the Nietos see it, as they loved the play and fully support it.

Thanks to all who have proven their amor and continue to fight the good fight.

https://todobododown.wordpress.com/2016/11/03/we-fly-even-when-we-fall-a-review-of-on-the-hill-i-am-alex-nieto/

“On The Hill: I am Alex Nieto” SOLD OUT ALL SHOWS!

Share true love 🙂

“On the Hill: I am Alex Nieto” International art full of amor! The greatest show I have ever witnessed in my life. The youth performing the true story of the Amor for Alex Nieto movement. Inspiring, horrible, and transformational. Thank you Paul S. Flores for your amazing leadership and love. Thank you to the Pachanga poets as well 🙂 Blessings to our loving community.

Stay tuned for our next moves: The Alex Nieto Memorial and justice for all, inlcuding Mario Woods and Amilcar!

~Ben Bac Sierra~

 

Letter to the Editor of Bernalwood

Note: This letter to the editor was sent by Maria Villalta to the Bernalwood editor in response to his article “Supervisor Campos Announces Support for Permanent Alex Nieto Memorial on Bernal Hill.” We invite supporters to leave a comment in favor of the permanent memorial as well, although it currently seems like Mr. Lappin is not approving nor publishing those comments sent by supporters of the Nieto Family.

To: Mr. Lappin, editor of Bernalwood
bernalwood@gmail.com

Dear Mr. Lappin,

My name is Maria Villalta, I was a friend of Alex Nieto and I am a member of the Justice and Love for Alex Nieto Coalition. I am responding to your post titled “Supervisor Campos Announces Support for Permanent Alex Nieto Memorial on Bernal Hill.” I am surprised at the tone of your article about the Nieto Family’s request for a permanent memorial for their son Alex Nieto on Bernal Heights. The request for a permanent memorial has been a long standing request of the family since the very early moments after his death, and I would assume that having a permanent memorial would be a proposal supported by the Bernal Heights neighbors who for two years and a half have kindly and generously supported the existing community memorial.

Soon after Alex’s death, his family, neighbors and community began keeping a memorial and altar for him at the site of his killing. Refugio Nieto maintains the altar daily on Bernal Heights along with anonymous community members who leave offerings of love and respect towards Alex. On the 21st of every month the community joins Elvira and Refugio at the altar, in prayer and celebration of Alex’s life. You are all invited to this upcoming month celebration of Alex’s life on Wednesday September 21st, 2016 at 6pm.

Establishing a memorial altar at sites of tragedy is a sacred tradition of Latino communities with deep ancestral and spiritual roots. An altar is a sacred place for sacrifices and gifts offered up to God, Our Creator. An altar is a place to show love towards our deceased. Memorials are official forms of altars; an important part of everyday American culture as well. Memorials allow people to remember a deceased loved one or an important public figure or event. The killing of Alex Nieto is now a historic event of the City that sparked a historic Latino social justice movement for love and justice over the senseless, avoidable and brutal killing of a young community member by the San Francisco Police Department.

As a San Francisco native I can tell you that many other native residents feel that Alex Nieto, a young, joyful, working class, student, and community organizer represents the spirit of the Latino Mission and Bernal Heights; a representation of the beautiful brown and black people that used to walk through these neighborhoods without questioning their safety or belonging to that land. The altar on the hill represents the ultimate sacrifice; a good life was lost at the hands of police. Alex was well known in the community, because of his dedicated community service since he was a youth. The brutal killing of Alex caused a lot of pain in our communities in Bernal and the Mission District and we should be allowed to mourn and uplift our beloved dead one.

In memory of Alex Nieto and in support of his parent’s demand posed to the Board of Supervisors this past September 13th, I am asking their Bernal Heights neighbors to join us in demanding the Board of Supervisors to issue a resolution for a permanent altar and memorial in his honor. To begin mending broken trust with the Nieto Family and their community, the very minimum the Mayor and Board of Supervisors could do is to provide the permits and resources to establish a permanent memorial for Alex Nieto on the hill. Have it be an act of restoration of all the trauma SFPD has caused the brown and black communities decade after decade. Let it be a protected space were we can safely grieve and be assured that any vandalism to the site will be prosecuted. We have asked that the City and County of San Francisco also pay for this memorial as it paid for the bullets that killed Alex. Whichever reading of the facts you wish to have and whichever stance you may have on a justice system that systematically sides with police, Alex Nieto’s killing by SFPD caused great harm in our Latino community and that harm needs to be mended by an act of restoration by the City. A memorial could mark a new beginning in which deathly use of force by SFPD is the last resort and sanctity of life the first principle of its police force.

On September 13th, your neighbors Elvira and Refugio Nieto petitioned the Supervisors of San Francisco to support a permanent memorial for their son Alex Nieto. We were accompanied in our request by Justice for Amilcar Perez Lopez, Justice for Luis Góngora Pat, Justice for Mario Woods Coalition, Compañeros del Barrio, the Church of St. John Coltrane, La Raza Students Organization in Hastings Law School, District Candidate Isawari España, Our Mission No Eviction, the Cultural Action Network, San Franciscans for Police Accountability, Poor Magazine, and the Manilatown Heritage Foundation, alongside many individual supporters who showed up for the Nieto Family at the press conference prior to our public comment petition.

We invite you to support our demand to the Board of Supervisors to restore harm caused by this City to Alex Nieto, his family and our Latino community with a permanent memorial at the site of the ongoing community memorial. The Nietos are considering a commemorative bench would be nice and plaque, but with our request approved we will welcome community input around a proposed memorial.

A permanent altar and memorial gives old school San Franciscans hope: Hope that the City we love and hold dearly to our hearts will attempt to restore our broken relationships with authorities and allow family, friends and the community to know about their past and design a better future together. According to Tyron Edwards, “Quiet and sincere sympathy is often the most welcome and efficient consolation to the afflicted.”

Thank you,
María Villalta
A friend of Alex Nieto, San Franciscan native, and member of the Justice & Love for Alex Nieto Coalition

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Supervisors commit to an ordinance for a permanent Alex Nieto memorial! How supporters can help…

Press conference and rally

September 13, 2016. City Hall, San Francisco, CA.-

Refugio and Elvira Nieto held a press conference outside City Hall to demand from the Board of Supervisors a permanent memorial on Bernal Heights for Alex Nieto.  In response, Supervisors Avalos and Campos expressed their commitments to support a resolution to the Board of Supervisors for a permanent memorial for Alex Nieto (see Live Videos on Justice 4 Alex Nieto Facebook group.) Danzantes opened the press conference with a prayer and friendship dance.

Specific statements of support were made by Ben Bac Sierra, María Villalta and Oscar Salinas members of the Justice & Love for Alex Nieto Coalition, Father Richard Smith of Justice for Amilcar Perez Lopez, Maria Cristina Gutierrez for Black and Brown Unity as part Compañeros del Barrio and Justice for Mario Woods Coalition, Archbishop King of the St. John Coltrane Church, United Playaz, Mayra Hernandez Co-Chair of La Raza in Hastings Law School, Luis Poot Pat of Justice for Luis Góngora Pat, Tony Serrano Garcia of Justice for Yanira Serrano Garcia, Isawari España, Roberto Hernandez from Our Mission No Eviction, and Rae from Cultural Action Network. Other groups in attendance and support included San Franciscans for Police Accountability, Prensa Pobre, and the Manilatown Heritage Foundation, alongside individual supporters who showed up for the Nieto Family.

Family addresses Board of Supervisors

After the press conference, supporters waited inside City Hall to provide public comment at the regular Board of Supervisors meeting. Public comment did not open until around 8 o’clock. Despite the long wait, many supporters remained to accompany the Nietos to demand a permanent Alex Nieto memorial.

Refugio Nieto addressed the BOS to explain how he goes everyday to pray an Our Father for Alex Nieto at the site of his killing, but is sometimes incapable of even saying a prayer because he might find the altar vandalized and in need of repair. He spoke of the cruelty of having to face such acts of hate, but also spoke of the many acts of care and love of others who made offerings to the altar. Elvira Nieto spoke to the Supervisors of her son, who was a good son, a good worker and student, who hoped to have children of his own one day, and asked for a permanent space to grieve and set up offerings. Both parents  spoke of the loss and the fact that the City had so far failed to give any adequate response for the killing of their son, Alex.

About a dozen supporters supported the Nietos by asking the Supervisors to recognize that harm had been done to the Nieto Family and the Latino community; that altars carried cultural significance to the Latino community; that the request for a permanent and protected altar and memorial was a most basic act of restoration; that Alex’s death was tied to gentrification policies of the City that allow newcomers to arrive in droves to the Mission without understanding the cultural differences and their privileges in the communities of color they come to displace and inhabit; that there has been no change in policing policies enacted; and that the memorial could stand to symbolize a break with the past and new era in which police end their brutal use of force against black and brown people of the City.

Supervisors Avalos and Campos commit to support an ordinance

In chambers, Supervisor John Avalos committed to drafting an ORDINANCE ordering a permanent memorial for Alex Nieto. Supervisor David Campos committed to be in support. While a resolution would only be a recommendation from the Board of Supervisors, an ORDINANCE would be a law ordering the memorial to be established. This was an important day for the Nietos and the justice & love for Alex Nieto movement.

Supervisor Avalos promised to draft and submit an ordinance to the Board of Supervisors within the next two weeks. In other words, by Tuesday September 27th.

How supporters can help:

Once Supervisor Avalos fulfills his promise and submits the ordinance to the BOS, we request that supporter:

  • Show up again for public comment at the Board of Supervisors to express themselves in favor of the ordinance.
  • Organize with their coalitions to have a lobbying day at City Hall in support of the permanent Alex Nieto Memorial and Altar.
  • Call their district supervisor and demand their support for the ordinance. Below is the list of supervisors and their office numbers and emails.
John Avalos John Avalos
District 11
(415) 554-6975 – Voice
(415) 554-6979 – Fax

John.Avalos@sfgov.org

David Campos David Campos
District 9
(415) 554-5144 – voice
(415) 554-6255 – fax

David.Campos@sfgov.org

Malia Cohen Malia Cohen
District 10
(415) 554-7670 – Voice
(415) 554-7674 – Fax

Malia.Cohen@sfgov.org

London Breed London Breed
District 5
(415) 554-7630 – Voice
(415) 554-7634 – Fax

London.Breed@sfgov.org

Aaron Peskin Aaron Peskin
District 3
(415) 554-7450 – Voice
(415) 554-7454

Aaron.Peskin@sfgov.org

Jane KIm Jane Kim
District 6
(415) 554-7970 – Voice
(415) 554-7974 – Fax

Jane.Kim@sfgov.org

Eric Mar Eric Mar
District 1
(415) 554-7410 – Voice
(415) 554-7415 – Fax

Eric.L.Mar@sfgov.org

Mark Ferrall Mark Farrell
District 2
(415) 554-7752 – Voice
(415) 554-7843 – Fax

Mark.Farrell@sfgov.org

Scott Wienter Scott Wiener
District 8
(415) 554-6968 – Voice
(415) 554-6909 – Fax

Scott.W

Norman Yee Norman Yee
District 7
(415) 554-6516 – Voice
(415) 554-6546 – Fax

Norman.Yee@

Thank you ! We’re going to make the permanent Alex Nieto Memorial and Altar a reality!